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The Toxic Mind with Armand DiMele

  

ArmandDiMele-PhotoIn "The Toxic Mind", host of “The Positive Mind” radio show and founder of the DiMele Center for Psychotherapy, Armand DiMele,  along with special guest Roberta Maria Atti, talks about the side effects of suppressing feelings like anger and frustration, and discuss ways to prevent the side effects from suppressing emotions and how to heal them.  Following is an excerpt from this important program.
 

Hey listen -- here’s something for you to consider. Consider this: the continual suppression of emotions during fight or flight reactions results in atrophy, an endogenous toxicosis in noradrenic neurons. How do you like them apples? That’s what our program is going to be about today. Today we’re going to be talking about this and that sounds pretty technical, doesn’t it? Well, Roberta and I have uncovered The Biology of Mental Illness and Violence, and it’s really remarkable, by E. Van Winkle. And by the way, this work is available in 23 languages. It’s called “The Toxic Mind”. E. Van Winkle just woke up to write this article. 

Let’s start with the theory, the idea here, the following hypothesis, right? The continued suppression of emotions means you feel something and you don’t let yourself manifest it. It comes up, you feel it, and it gets shut off for one reason or another. During fight or flight reactions, now that means when you’re excited, nervous, or tense, when your body is saying we have to do something and we’re going to get all ready for action. So that’s the fight or flight reactions, that if you don’t do something when your body says we’re ready to do something about the situation, it results in a toxic accumulation. Now that’s what we’re going to look at today. 

This is a really interesting thing. How could that be? How does it work? Well, we know how it works because we see it all the time. Your leader at work is in a miserable mood and they bark at you, and you get upset but you can’t say anything about it. So it boils. Part of the suppression of emotions is actually what is the backbone of civilization.   We as civilized humans, we suppress emotions in part because it’s necessary in order to function in a human society.

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Armand DiMele bio and links


Excerpt from "The Toxic Mind" by Armand DiMele

 

 

ArmandDiMele-PhotoIn "The Toxic Mind", host of “The Positive Mind” radio show and founder of the DiMele Center for Psychotherapy, Armand DiMele,  along with special guest Roberta Maria Atti, talks about the side effects of suppressing feelings like anger and frustration, and discuss ways to prevent the side effects from suppressing emotions and how to heal them.  Following is an excerpt from this important program.

 

 

 

Hey listen -- here’s something for you to consider. Consider this: the continual suppression of emotions during fight or flight reactions results in atrophy, an endogenous toxicosis in noradrenic neurons. How do you like them apples? That’s what our program is going to be about today. Today we’re going to be talking about this and that sounds pretty technical, doesn’t it? Well, Roberta and I have uncovered The Biology of Mental Illness and Violence, and it’s really remarkable, by E. Van Winkle. And by the way, this work is available in 23 languages. It’s called “The Toxic Mind”. E. Van Winkle just woke up to write this article. 

Let’s start with the theory, the idea here, the following hypothesis, right? The continued suppression of emotions means you feel something and you don’t let yourself manifest it. It comes up, you feel it, and it gets shut off for one reason or another. During fight or flight reactions, now that means when you’re excited, nervous, or tense, when your body is saying we have to do something and we’re going to get all ready for action. So that’s the fight or flight reactions, that if you don’t do something when your body says we’re ready to do something about the situation, it results in a toxic accumulation. Now that’s what we’re going to look at today. 

This is a really interesting thing. How could that be? How does it work? Well, we know how it works because we see it all the time. Your leader at work is in a miserable mood and they bark at you, and you get upset but you can’t say anything about it. So it boils. Part of the suppression of emotions is actually what is the backbone of civilization.   We as civilized humans, we suppress emotions in part because it’s necessary in order to function in a human society.

Click here to order and listen to a free preview

Armand DiMele bio and links


Excerpt from "Weeping and Crying" by Armand DiMele

 

ArmandDiMele-PhotoIn "Weeping and Crying", host of “The Positive Mind” radio show and founder of the DiMele Center for Psychotherapy, Armand DiMele,  along with special guest Roberta Maria Atti, offers a great talk on how scientific research has shown that there is strong and consistent evidence that crying is linked to significant health benefit. Following is an excerpt from this fascinating program.


 Now listen to this. You know you heard about people laughing on the outside and crying on the inside? You know, crying on the inside, you cry a lot more on the inside than you do on the outside is what our research shows. That when you cry on the outside there is a certain amount of water coming out. A certain amount of this lacrimal fluid coming out which is fed by water. And you are aware of it. And on the inside there is an enormous amount. I don’t know what the ratio is, but I know it is bigger, and so that stuff coming out of your nose is also tears. And I also have noticed that when people do not want to cry outwardly, let’s say that they are embarrassed, sometimes the inside crying is increased so that people may say, “Oh, I have a lot of mucous in my throat.” 


So one of the signs of people inhibiting crying -- which we are going to go to in a couple of minutes -- is an increase of mucosa inside and something else. They think it is mucous. In fact, mucous formation, or people who think they sometimes have sinus drips, really may be crying on the inside, you know? And it could be all that it is about. And what they do is in part is alexithymic because they disconnect from the awareness of the process, so it may be happening without them knowing that indeed they are weeping. 


So people that don’t cry may in effect cry and then people who don’t weep -- there are some people who never weep -- they would easily weep on the inside and that could be interpreted in any number of ways because remember again, weeping on the inside without it coming out of your body could easily be filled with an enormous amount of bacteria that doesn’t belong down in your throat. And you could think that it is a form of an allergy for instance. You could say, “I have allergies” and you really could be crying. You could be sad. And a good cry may actually get this stuff out of your body and you could feel purged of that thing which you thought was your allergic reaction. It’s a theory, but we’re going to teach you more about this and you’re going to find a lot of evidence for it.


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Excerpt from Armand DiMele's Talk on "Disconnecting the Mind"

ArmandDiMele-PhotoIn "Disconnecting the Mind," Armand DiMele, founder of the DiMele Center for Psychotherapy and host of “The Positive Mind” radio show, examines the different ways we disconnect our minds from the stresses of everyday life, and offers instruction on new ways to deal with stress without disconnecting from reality.  In this excerpt, DiMele talks about using substances to disconnect.


 

 

Let’s think about some of the different fugue states, ways of spacing out, that we all have. Or know, or might have known. I mean, drugs are a classic one. You know -- typical drugs. Any drugs if you think about them. You know, alcohol helps you space out. You know… if you’ve ever been a drinker, or a non-drinker, not an alcoholic, but if you’ve ever had this yearning, “I gotta have a drink.” Now, I haven’t known that for ages but I remember it well. Having one drink and feeling the alcohol burn down my system as it kind of goes down and whatever form it goes in -- whether it be a cosmopolitan or a Manhattan or bourbon or whatever it was -- whatever it is going down, whenever it hits you, you can feel this kind of glow take over you. And in a way, what you’ve done is you’ve fugued. You’ve spaced. You had a little distance between you and life. 


Marijuana -- same thing. Toke on a joint. The kind of thing where you get that feeling, that first, that one puff, I’m dying to have it. Cigarette smoking, perpetual spacing out. You know, the interesting thing about cigarette smoking is it’s always predictable what the person is avoiding. It’s anger. One of the ways of avoiding anger the most is with cigarette smoking. Most cigarette smokers are very angry people who just don’t know what to do with their anger. They’re controlling it at all times. So if you take away cigarettes from somebody who’s a cigarette smoker, they become rageful for awhile. That’s alright; I mean, you know cigarette smoking is not healthy for you. Lock yourself up in a pen somewhere, you know. Make sure you go through your rages. Get yourself one of our soundproof rooms that we have here. Scream, jump, pound, and go through it. But rage is what comes up, and you have no protection against it when you give up your cigarettes. 


Other drugs -- ecstasy, ketamine --  really take you out there. Talk about spacing out. Ecstasy takes you into the form of love that we’re going to talk about, which is another way of spacing out. LSD, without a shadow of a doubt.


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Armand DiMele bio and links